Niche networks in higher ed

May 1st, 2012 § 2 comments

Tomorrow, I’ll be talking to a group of USC librarians about academic social networks and more generally about how social media has affected the scholarly communication process. It’s an informal, brief 15-20 minute talk as part of our “Brown Bag Lunch” series. The following includes my slides from the presentation, a list of websites mentioned, as well as a selected bibliography.

Social networks mentioned:

 

Tools mentioned:

 

Bibliography:

Brown, L. Griffiths, R., & Rascoff, M. (2007). University publishing in a digital age. Accessed from http://www.ithaka.org/

Campbell, J.D. (2006). Changing a cultural icon: The academic library as a virtual destination,” EDUCAUSE Review 41(1). Accessed from http://www.educause.edu/

Carpenter, M., Graybill, J., Offord, J., & Piorun, M. (2011). Envisioning the library’s role in scholarly communication in the year 2025. Portal-Libraries and the Academy, 11, 659-681.

Faculty Focus. (2010). Twitter in higher education 2010 : Usage habits and trends of today’s college faculty. Madison, WI: Magna Publications. Acessed from http://www.scribd.com/doc/37621209/2010-Twitter-Survey-Report

Gu, F., Widén-Wulff, G. (2011). Scholarly communication and possible changes in the context of social media: A Finnish case study. The Electronic Library, 29(6), 762-776.

Howard, J. (2012, February 28). Tracking scholarly influence beyond the impact factor. Chronicle of Higher Education. Accessed from http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/tracking-scholarly-influence-beyond-the-impact-factor/35565

Howard, J. (2012, January 29). Scholars seek better ways to track impact online. Chronicle of Higher Education. Accessed from http://chronicle.com/article/As-Scholarship-Goes-Digital/130482/

Howard, J. (2010). The MLA convention meets twitter: Twitter moves scholarly communication beyond annual meetings sessions and papers. Chronicle of Higher Education. Accessed from http://search.proquest.com/docview/214635705?accountid=14749

Macilwain, C. (2011). Facebook of science seeks to reshape peer review. Chronicle of Higher Education. Accessed from http://search.proquest.com/docview/849233840?accountid=14749

Maron, N.L. & Smith, K.K. (2008). Current Mmdels of digital scholarly communication. Washington, DC : Association of Research Libraries. Accessed from http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/current-models-report.pdf

Nicholas, D., Watkinson, A. Rowlands, I., & Jubb, M. (2011). Social media, academic research and the role of university libraries. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(5), 373-375.

Ponte, D. & Simon, J. (2011). Scholarly communication 2.0: Exploring researchers’ opinions on Web 2.0 for scientific knowledge creation, evaluation and dissemination. Serials Review, 37(3), 149-156.

Research Information Network. (2007). Research and the scholarly communications orocess: Towards strategic goals for public policy. London: RIN. Accessed from http://www.rin.ac.uk/sc-statement

Roman, D. (2011). Scholarly publishing model needs an update. Communications of the ACM, 54(1), 16, 96.

Voss, A., & Procter, R. (2009). Virtual research environments in scholarly work and communications. Library Hi Tech, 27(2), 174-190.

Wand, X., Jiang, T., $ Ma, F. (2010). Blog-supported scientific communication: An exploratory analysis based on social hyperlinks in a Chinese blog community. Journal of Information Science, 36, 690-704.

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